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Saving Paradise

Posted by on Mar 1, 2013 in Asia, Projects | Comments Off on Saving Paradise

Saving Paradise

The Pacific Islands region spreads over more than 38 million km2 of ocean. Within this vast body of water, dry land is in short supply, and represented by a sprinkling of immensely important forested islands. Pacific wildlife is unique – 60% of plants, 70% of birds, 50% of reptiles, 73% of mammals, and 100% of amphibians are found nowhere else on the planet. Sadly, these species have some of the highest extinction rates in the world. Since humans arrived a staggering 2,000 birds have become extinct.

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WWF – Biodiversity Annamites

Posted by on Oct 19, 2012 in Asia, Projects | Comments Off on WWF – Biodiversity Annamites

WWF – Biodiversity Annamites

Forming the southern part of the globally important Greater Annamites Ecoregion, the Southern Annamites is a key site for the protection of Vietnam’s rarest large mammals and a host of range restricted and endemic species. Natural vegetation in this landscape is predominantly semi-evergreen/wet evergreen forest. Somewhat isolated from similar forests in the Annamites mountain chain, these lowland forests have a distinctive bird and mammal fauna. Of the 122 mammal species known from the Ecoregion, three are near-endemic species, and two are endemic. Some of the threatened species in this assemblage include the tiger, Asian elephant, black-shanked douc, gaur, banteng, Southern serow, clouded leopard, pygmy loris, pig-tailed macaque, dhole, Malayan sun bear and smooth-coated otter.

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Nepcon – Maiau Basin Sabah

Posted by on Apr 1, 2012 in Asia, Projects | Comments Off on Nepcon – Maiau Basin Sabah

Nepcon – Maiau Basin Sabah

The Maliau Basin, also known as The Lost World of Sabah, is situated in the heart of Sabah, Borneo, and belongs to some of the most biologically diverse areas in the tropics. BirdLife International has designated the area as an IBA with more than 270 bird species; hereof many listed on IUCN’s Red List. Now, the previous Malaysian project partner, the Sabah Foundation, has invited NEPCon to participate in a project, which shall update the management plan. This once more provides a unique opportunity to provide special Danish assistance to the protection of the Maliau Basin, which is part of the few, but globally significant conservation areas that have escaped the heavy logging activities and forest conversions affecting large tracts of Sabah and the rest of Borneo.

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Fiji – Sustainable forest management

Posted by on Jan 1, 2012 in Asia, Projects | Comments Off on Fiji – Sustainable forest management

Fiji – Sustainable forest management

The tropical forests of the Fiji Islands are critical for the conservation of Fiji’s unique biodiversity (over 90% of which are associated with forest habitats), provide valuable ecosystem services (such as soil conservation, water purification and carbon storage) and are very important for their deeply-rooted traditional social and cultural values. 90% of Fiji’s land and forests are owned by indigenous ‘family clans’ called mataqali. Forests provide the main source of livelihood for these mataqali. It is their great provider, and they are its guardian. About half of Fiji’s forests have already been lost through clearance for agriculture, unsustainable logging and fire. To reverse this trend the government has agreed a Fiji Forest Policy (2007) that identifies Permanent Forest Estates (PFE) within which landowners can become part of the forest industry through sustainably managing their forest or providing permanent protection.

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Turtle foundation

Posted by on Aug 6, 2010 in Africa, Asia, Projects | Comments Off on Turtle foundation

Turtle foundation

All seven species of sea turtles are endangered due to human activity. In many places of the world, a large number of adult turtles are still brutally slaughtered. In other areas, turtle populations are threatened by the plundering of nests, unmitigated beach development, pollution, and fishing bycatch. Worldwide the stocks of sea turtles have declined by over 60% in the last 100 years, bringing some species to the brink of extinction. In many regions, local populations are already gone.

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WWF – Coral shrimp project

Posted by on Mar 6, 2010 in Asia, Projects | Comments Off on WWF – Coral shrimp project

WWF – Coral shrimp project

The incidental capture of untargeted species – bycatch – has become a major political, management, sectoral and environmental focus, bringing its implications to the forefront as a conservation, sustainability and food security imperative. Of particular concern in the Coral Triangle region is shrimp trawling – an activity, which harvests an estimated tens of thousands of endangered marine turtles every year and which also catches a significant amount of other non-target (and unmanaged) fish and shellfish. An on-board WWF observations program in the Arafura Sea (near Papua) in 2005-2006 revealed that an average of 2-20 sea turtles were incidentally caught in each vessel during trawl operations.

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Forests of Fiji

Posted by on Mar 4, 2009 in Asia, Projects | Comments Off on Forests of Fiji

Forests of  Fiji

Forests of Fiji – Creating Permanent Forest Estates for the Benefit of Fiji’s People and Biodiversity. The tropical forests of the FijiIslands contain some of the richest natural communities of all the oceanic islands of the Pacific and these forests are critical for the conservation of Fiji’s endemic biodiversity. Fiji’s forests also contribute substantially to the quality of life of the rural people, providing timber and non-timber products, and environmental services such as soil conservation, water catchment, and carbon sinks.

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WWF – Illegal wildlife trade

Posted by on Jan 1, 2009 in Asia, Projects | Comments Off on WWF – Illegal wildlife trade

WWF – Illegal wildlife trade

Illegal wildlife trade is driving a rapid extinction of species throughout the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS)1 and is arguably one of the most pressing drivers of biodiversity loss in the region. Species that have suffered drastic declines include charismatic large mammals such as tiger Panthera tigris, Sumatran rhino Dicerorhinus sumatrensis, Javan rhino Rhinoceros sondaicus, and Asian elephant Elephas maximus. Numerous lesser known animal and plant species have also been affected, including pangolins Manis spp., slow lorises Nycticebus spp., freshwater turtles and tortoises, agarwood Aquilaria spp., and various wild orchid species.

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WWF – Mekong Giant Catfish

Posted by on Jan 1, 2007 in Asia, Projects | Comments Off on WWF – Mekong Giant Catfish

WWF – Mekong Giant Catfish

The Mekong giant catfish is one of the largest freshwater fish species in the world but has rarely been captured by fishermen in the entire Mekong Basin over the last 10 years. This is despite high fishing intensity in all regions where the species is known to occur. The Mekong giant catfish is only found in the Mekong river and its tributaries in Cambodia, Laos and Thailand. Local fishermen have previously caught specimens weighing over 300kg and more than 3m in length. A century ago, the Mekong giant catfish was found the entire length of the river from Vietnam to southern China.

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WWF – Irrawaddy dolphin Project

Posted by on Jan 1, 2007 in Asia, Projects | Comments Off on WWF – Irrawaddy dolphin Project

WWF – Irrawaddy dolphin Project

The largest freshwater population of lrrawaddy dolphins occurs along the Mekong River in Cambodia and southern Laos. This subpopulation is classifled as ‘ Critically Endangered’ by the IUCN with estimates of 80-100 individuals. Between 2001 and 2006, 72 dolphins – 60% of which were calves, died along the Mekong River. These figures underestimate true mortality as they do not reflect undetected deaths. Without understanding the etiology of dolphin mortality, extinction of the Mekong population will be unavoidable. Research to date has found that at least 64% of adult deaths are due to anthropogenic causes, particularly entanglement in fishing gear. Measures are underway to address this and encouragingly fewer dead adults are now being found. In contrast, aetiology has only been determined for one calf.

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