Africa

Projects in Africa

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Maremani Nature Reserve

Posted by on Jun 3, 2013 in Africa | Comments Off on Maremani Nature Reserve

Maremani Nature Reserve

Maremani Nature Reserve In northernmost South Africa close to the Limpopo River, which is the frontier to Zimbabwe, the Aage V. Jensen Charity Foundation has since 1999 developed a nature reserve of 38,000 ha. Duration: Ongoing Website: www.maremani.com Project background Through the acquisition of a number of arid hunting and infertile farming areas it has become possible to let the natural animal life of the wooded savannah regenerate in a large continuous natural area without internal fences, but with watering holes and secure...

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Gola National Park

Posted by on Jan 2, 2013 in Africa, Projects | Comments Off on Gola National Park

Gola National Park

This project was launched in May 2009 by the Presidents of both Liberia and Sierra Leone at a high profile event in Lelhun, Sierra Leone. The Peace Park project is working to develop and implement a trans-boundary conservation model that will ensure cross-border collaboration and guarantee the long term survival of this key part of the Upper Guinea Forest Eco-region through the engagement of local communities and civil society in the active conservation of the forests.

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Lake Victoria Basin

Posted by on Jan 1, 2013 in Africa, Projects | Comments Off on Lake Victoria Basin

Lake Victoria Basin

With a surface area of 68,800 square kilometres, Lake Victoria is Africa’s largest lake by area, and the largest tropical lake in the world. The swamps, forests and islands in and around Lake Victoria are important for a diversity of wildlife, and there are at least 16 Important Bird Areas (IBAs) directly connected to the lake system within bordering countries (Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania) and more in the wider Lake Victoria Basin (including in Rwanda and Burundi). They provide habitat to species such as the Papyrus Gonolek Laniarius mufumbiri (NT), the Shoebill Balaeniceps rex (Vu) as well as important congregations of water birds (e.g. 5,500 breeding pairs of Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo at Lutoboka Point in Uganda).

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MERU – Ezemvelo Project

Posted by on Mar 19, 2012 in Africa, Projects | Comments Off on MERU – Ezemvelo Project

MERU – Ezemvelo Project

In 2008, the Oppenheimer family donated a 4500 hectare Nature Reserve, Ezemvelo Nature Reserve, to our non-profit, the Maharishi lnstitute, to provide a stunning location for a new sustainable rural university, MERU. Ezemvelo is conservatively valued at R35.5 million, or 28 million DKK. MERU is being founded to educate disadvantaged youth in the conservation and “green” industries. The breakthrough concept combines education, poverty alleviation, and elimate change awareness and reduction into one solution. lndividuals and communities will learn how to create wealth out of emerging 21st century green technologies.

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Birds of São Tomé

Posted by on Mar 19, 2012 in Africa, Projects | Comments Off on Birds of São Tomé

Birds of São Tomé

São Tome and Príncipe, constitutes one of the most important countries for biodiversity in the world. It has a high level of endemism of many taxonomic groups. The islands host 95 bird species of which 27 species are endemic to the islands. The island is one of Africa’s major centres of wildlife endemism. The island holds three Critically Endangered bird species – the São Tomé Fiscal (Lanius newtoni), the São Tomé Grosbeak (Neospiza concolor), and the Dwarf Olive Ibis (Bostrychia bocagei) – which are found nowhere else on earth. All three species occur in the lowland forests in the south-west of the island. These forests have been classified as the second most important forests for bird conservation in Africa.

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Turtle foundation

Posted by on Aug 6, 2010 in Africa, Asia, Projects | Comments Off on Turtle foundation

Turtle foundation

All seven species of sea turtles are endangered due to human activity. In many places of the world, a large number of adult turtles are still brutally slaughtered. In other areas, turtle populations are threatened by the plundering of nests, unmitigated beach development, pollution, and fishing bycatch. Worldwide the stocks of sea turtles have declined by over 60% in the last 100 years, bringing some species to the brink of extinction. In many regions, local populations are already gone.

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Lake Natron – Tanzania

Posted by on Apr 5, 2010 in Africa, Projects | Comments Off on Lake Natron – Tanzania

Lake Natron – Tanzania

BirdLife International’s work involves the protection of sites of global significance for biodiversity conservation termed as Important Bird Areas (IBAs). In Africa, over 1,200 sites are vital to both flora and fauna and are also a source of livelihoods for the communities living around them.
Lake Natron in Northern Tanzania is one such site. Since 2006, the shallow saline lake has drawn global attention as a result of a soda ash mining proposal initially put forward by Tata Chemicals Industries and the Government of Tanzania.

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Tana River – Conservation and Development

Posted by on Mar 6, 2010 in Africa, Projects | Comments Off on Tana River – Conservation and Development

Tana River – Conservation and Development

The project targeted the Tana River Delta (02 30’ S, 40 20’ E), in Tana River and Lamu Districts of Coast Province. The delta has an estimated area of 130,000 ha within altitude of 0-37 m above sea level. Tana Delta presents a complex system of freshwater, brackish lakes and streams, saline grasslands and wetlands and successional stages of forest woodland on the river banks and dunes parallel to the shore. This complex habitat hosts biodiversity of global conservation importance. Given the unique biodiversity, Tana Delta has been recognized globally, as Important Bird Area/Key Biodiversity Area and therefore the site has been prioritized by Nature Kenya for conservation action.

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WSPA – Human Elephant conflict reduction

Posted by on Mar 1, 2010 in Africa, Projects | Comments Off on WSPA – Human Elephant conflict reduction

WSPA – Human Elephant conflict reduction

In 2009, WSPA and the Tanzania Wildlife Research lnstitute (TAWIRI) co-operated with local villages to develop a practical approach that proved to work successfully; the chilli fence. The chillies used are so strong that they are completely inedible for humans, and elephants cannot stand neither the taste nor the smell. When the chillies are used in the fences it effectively keeps the elephants away. A good example is a 14 day test we did in 2009, when the fence was tested by 24 local farmers. The results were amazing: No elephants entered the fields enclosed by the chili i fences, while the fields that were surrounded by regular fences were protected to 171(reported) cases of “break in”.

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WSPA – Reintroduction of Bonobos

Posted by on Jun 26, 2009 in Africa, Projects | Comments Off on WSPA – Reintroduction of Bonobos

WSPA – Reintroduction of Bonobos

The main aim of the project is to secure the survival of the species in the wild. Through thorough measuring and registration, we will be able to use our experiences to create a basis for a proper register that contains knowledge to be used over the next few years. The bonobos will also be counted and monitored to prevent poaching and to keep track of how well the bonobos survive on their own.

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