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WWF – Irrawaddy dolphin Project

WWF – Irrawaddy dolphin Project

The largest freshwater population of lrrawaddy dolphins occurs along the Mekong River in Cambodia and southern Laos. This subpopulation is classifled as ‘ Critically Endangered’ by the IUCN with estimates of 80-100 individuals. Between 2001 and 2006, 72 dolphins – 60% of which were calves, died along the Mekong River. These figures underestimate true mortality as they do not reflect undetected deaths. Without understanding the etiology of dolphin mortality, extinction of the Mekong population will be unavoidable. Research to date has found that at least 64% of adult deaths are due to anthropogenic causes, particularly entanglement in fishing gear. Measures are underway to address this and encouragingly fewer dead adults are now being found. In contrast, aetiology has only been determined for one calf.

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WSPA – Lewa Wildlife Conservancy

WSPA – Lewa Wildlife Conservancy

Since ancient times, hunters in Africa have used snares to catch their pray. Today however, the wildlife in Africa is hunted more than ever due to the increasing demand for wildlife meat in both the local and the international markets. Poaching and snaring are major problems in the Hombe and Ragati valleys near Mountain Lodge in the Mt. Kenya Forest Reserve. This project will support the work of an anti-poaching/de-snaring team and a mobile wildlife Veterinary Unit operating in the area to remave snares, deter poachers and provide veterinary care for affected wildlife.

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Nanok

Nanok

When the last trappers left Greenland in the late 1950s, their more than 300 trappers’ huts soon began to dilapidate. Only a few of them were used and maintained by the Sirius patrol. Polar bears ransacked the huts every now and then and the Sirius patrol therefore began to build their own network of new, bear-proof cabins. In the summer of 1991 a private group of North East Greenland enthusiasts established the non-profit society Nanok in order to save the old huts. The idea was to repair a number of the huts so that they could both function as small “open-air museums” and be used by people working or travelling in North East Greenland.

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Land purchase at Kinangop

Land purchase at Kinangop

The Kinangop Plateau covers about 300 square miles (770 km sq) between the forested Aberdare Mountains in the east and the Rift Valley in the west. This is high country, lying more than 2,400 meters (7,874 feet) above sea level. Historically, it was a cool, often misty montane grassland. The human population consisted of small Kikuyu settlements, and the Maasai sometimes brought their cattle to graze the plains (the name Kinangop, in fact, is of Maasai origin and refers to a cold, flat, wet place).

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Ostrovik Meadow

Ostrovik Meadow

In the previously implemented project “Saving the Bird Paradise of Slovakia; Protection and purchase of Ostrovik meadow in Senne, Eastern Slovakia” realised from 1st December 2005 till 30th June 2006 Slovak Ornithological Society/BirdLife Slovakia purchased in two rounds, a total of 33.44 hectares of wet meadows, in Important Bird Area / Special Protected Area Senne covered by the grant from the Aage V. Jensen Charity Foundation. In October 2006 SOS/BirdLife Slovakia together with BirdLife International submitted another project “Further Purchase and Protection of the Ostrovik Meadow Reserve 2006” which was again kindly supported by Aage V. Jensen Charity Foundation.

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