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Madagascar’s wetlands

Madagascar’s wetlands

BirdLife International, working with its Malagasy affiliate NGO, Asity Madagascar, is leading efforts to create two large Protected Areas in Madagascar’s wetlands. The two Protected Areas are known as the Mahavavy-Kinkony Complex in north-western Madagascar and the Mangoky-Ihotry Complex in south-western Madagascar. Each site includes a large river delta with estuary and mangrove areas, freshwater marshes and rivers, lakes and sandy and rocky coast. The sites also contain dry land ecosystems including deciduous forest, grasslands and caves; both also have a substantial human population.

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IBA Local Conservation Groups

IBA Local Conservation Groups

Analysis shows that the threats to Important Bird Areas are nearly always caused by people. But people are also part of the solution, and working with people at IBAs helps to engage a mainly local constituency in support of IBA conservation. It builds on what are often strong connections – economic, cultural, historical – between people and the sites where they live, work and engage in recreation. Working with local people can help to: galvanise local support and passion for conservation; mobilise the voice, influence and impact of local stakeholders; raise local awareness of the site and its local to global values; provide a cost effective mechanism for recording change and identifying threats; and provide an avenue for linking conservation of the environment to development and the livelihoods of local people.

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WWF – Kasungu-Lukusuzi TFCA

WWF – Kasungu-Lukusuzi TFCA

The proposed Transfrontier Conservation Area (TFCA) is made up of two nationally gazetted national parks i.e., Kasungu (Malawi) and Lukususizi (Zambia) and will also encompass the Mwasemphangwe and Chikomene customary lands located between the two parks. Conceptually TFCAs can enhance conservation while spearheading the socio-economic development of targeted areas The Kasungu­-Lukusuzi system has the potential to make a viable TFCA and is one of the Miombo Ecoregion’s areas of biological significance. Historically, there arewell known movements of large mammals between two parks including elephant, giraffe, and puku. Further, the area holds an endemic tree frog Hyperolius kachololae, and an endemic fish – Mpasa – which breeds in the rivers running off the escarpment.

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WWF – Zambesi River

WWF – Zambesi River

The Zambezi River Basin (ZRB) is Africa’s fourth largest River system. The basin covers an area of 1,4 million Km2 over eight countries and in a relatively dry part of sub-Saharan Africa, the river system supports livelihoods of over 40 million people in Southern Africa. A potentially controversial transfer of Zambezi Waters into the South African Province of Gauteng centered on Johannesburg’s ‘lndustrial Giant’ has been contemplated. Starting off in the Kaiene Hills in western Zambia, the river covers 2,700 km to the Indian Ocean. lt supports an abundant wealth of human, animal and aquatic life and a number of protected areas along its course a wide variety and high number of large mammalian herbivores such as white and black rhino, elephant, hippo, giraffe, lions, wild dogs and various antelopes.

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WWF – Mekong Giant Catfish

WWF – Mekong Giant Catfish

The Mekong giant catfish is one of the largest freshwater fish species in the world but has rarely been captured by fishermen in the entire Mekong Basin over the last 10 years. This is despite high fishing intensity in all regions where the species is known to occur. The Mekong giant catfish is only found in the Mekong river and its tributaries in Cambodia, Laos and Thailand. Local fishermen have previously caught specimens weighing over 300kg and more than 3m in length. A century ago, the Mekong giant catfish was found the entire length of the river from Vietnam to southern China.

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