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Fiji – Sustainable forest management

Fiji – Sustainable forest management

The tropical forests of the Fiji Islands are critical for the conservation of Fiji’s unique biodiversity (over 90% of which are associated with forest habitats), provide valuable ecosystem services (such as soil conservation, water purification and carbon storage) and are very important for their deeply-rooted traditional social and cultural values. 90% of Fiji’s land and forests are owned by indigenous ‘family clans’ called mataqali. Forests provide the main source of livelihood for these mataqali. It is their great provider, and they are its guardian. About half of Fiji’s forests have already been lost through clearance for agriculture, unsustainable logging and fire. To reverse this trend the government has agreed a Fiji Forest Policy (2007) that identifies Permanent Forest Estates (PFE) within which landowners can become part of the forest industry through sustainably managing their forest or providing permanent protection.

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Sustaining NGO Capacity

Sustaining NGO Capacity

This project was designed to ameliorate the effects of the global economic downturn on BirdLife Partner NGOs. As a result of the recession, funding streams to some NGOs were significantly reduced and important conservation work was severely curtailed. In response, the NGOs took corrective action including introducing staff pay cuts or scaling back activities. This response was partially effective, but there were still core funding gaps to be filled. This project was meant to help fill these gaps through awards of a series of “small” grants funds to selected NGOs.

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Crown jewels of the High Andes

Crown jewels of the High Andes

The wetlands of the high Andes from Venezuela to Argentina form a key component of paramo, jalca and puna ecosystems. They play a vital role in providing water to ecosystems and human communities at lower elevations, and are of key importance for resident and migratory biodiversity, including significant numbers of highly threatened species such as Bogota Rail (EN), Junín Grebe (CR), Titicaca Grebe (EN), Hooded Grebe (EN) and Andean Flamingo (VU).
High Andean wetland eco-regions are widely recognised as being globally threatened. The wetlands and the unique biodiversity they maintain are threatened through drainage, hydroelectric dams, changes in hydrological cycles, introduced species, overexploitation and incidental catch. These wetlands and the environmental services they provide are also expected to be severely affected by climate change.

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Turtle foundation

Turtle foundation

All seven species of sea turtles are endangered due to human activity. In many places of the world, a large number of adult turtles are still brutally slaughtered. In other areas, turtle populations are threatened by the plundering of nests, unmitigated beach development, pollution, and fishing bycatch. Worldwide the stocks of sea turtles have declined by over 60% in the last 100 years, bringing some species to the brink of extinction. In many regions, local populations are already gone.

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Lake Natron – Tanzania

Lake Natron – Tanzania

BirdLife International’s work involves the protection of sites of global significance for biodiversity conservation termed as Important Bird Areas (IBAs). In Africa, over 1,200 sites are vital to both flora and fauna and are also a source of livelihoods for the communities living around them.
Lake Natron in Northern Tanzania is one such site. Since 2006, the shallow saline lake has drawn global attention as a result of a soda ash mining proposal initially put forward by Tata Chemicals Industries and the Government of Tanzania.

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